News

BTAC - Track Clearing - Volunteers Needed

Labour Day weekend, Friday 10th – Monday 13th March.  Read more...

Detours, Yarra State Forest

Detours will be in place in the Yarra State forest during February/March to ensure public safety around timber harvesting operations.  Read more...

Grampians Peak Trail

Excitement in the Grampians is building, as construction on the northern and southern sections of the Peaks Trail gets underway.
Parks Victoria is working with hikers to plan the most scenic walks through the area. Watch this video

Deer Hunting on Snake Island

The Victorian Government announced recently that it would allow a trial to hunt hog deer on the island for a two year period. Bushwalking Victoria has a number of concerns reagrding this proposal. Read more ...

Peaks Challenge Falls Creek

Due to the many cyclists taking part in the event, a number of road closures and changes to traffic conditions will be made in the region on Sunday 12 March. Read more...
 
Replacement of Toilet Block - Ritchie's Hut
 
Parks Victoria are currently in the process of replacing the existing toilet at Ritchie's hut.

The works are scheduled between February and April 2017.

There may be no toilet available for use between this period as the old toilet will be decommissioned. Please ensure you walk at least 100 metres from the river or any water way, dig a hole and bury your waste and toilet paper very carefully.

If you have any queries, please contact Parks Victoria, Mansfield on 13 1963.

Member Discounts

Make the most of your membership discounts!

pdfDiscount List

WALKSAFE

Means in the UNLIKELY EVENT of >> 

Snakebite

Snakebite is more a fear than a reality. Whilst estimates of the incidence of snakebite throughout Australia is several thousand a year, of these only about 300 require antivenom treatment and on average 1-2 cases a year result in death. Bushwalkers are not identified in the statistics as a high risk group.

Prevention

Unprovoked, snakes rarely attack humans. Therefore, do not disturb a snake in your pathway, simply alert the other members of your party to give it a wide berth. Always wear stout footwear and be observant. Take particular care in warm weather, long grass, hollow logs, near water or rocks in sunny positions.

In areas where snakes are prevalent it is wise to wear long trousers and/or gaiters. Although snakes cannot hear they can detect vibrations in the ground, so walk heavily to encourage them to instinctively flee from your path. When camping, use a tent with an integral floor and always zip up the doors. Use a torch at night.

Recognition

Victims usually know they have been bitten. Symptoms may appear 15 minutes to 2 hours after the bite and may be mild or severe, depending on the species and the bite. Symptoms include: double vision, headache, nausea and vomiting, sweating, faintness, diarrhoea, chest pain, difficulty swallowing or breathing, swollen lymph glands in groin or armpit, drowsiness.

Treatment

The principle of the treatment of snake bite is to reduce the amount of venom that reaches the blood stream by applying firm pressure over the bitten area and minimizing movement by the victim. The lower leg is the most vulnerable to snakebite when bushwalking. If a member of the party is bitten:

  1. Immediately apply firm pressure over the bite site.
  2. Lay the victim down and keep them calm and at complete rest.
  3. Apply a broad firm bandage to the bitten area and around as much of the limb as possible, without removing clothing if this means moving the limb. Bandage as tightly as for a sprain and work up the limb to include the joint above the bite site.
  4. Immobilize the limb with a makeshift splint.
  5. Constantly observe the patient for shock and respiratory failure.Dispatch other member/s of the party with knowledge of your location to bring outside help to transport the patient.
  6. If external help is unavailable, the best option is probably to rest for a day or two, and then proceed to the nearest civilisation taking care to minimize stress to the patient.

DO NOT deliberately disturb a snake.
DO NOT walk in sandals or thongs.
DO NOT cut or wash a bite - venom on bandages can be used to identify the snake, which is required to ensure the correct anti-venom is used.
DO NOT apply an arterial tourniquet.